News Roundup: Feedback and deeper learning

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This week: The values of midsemester feedback and the importance of roles, culture, and bias in higher education. Plus, ACUE partners with University of Nevada, Reno.


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The University of Nevada, Reno has launched ACUE’s Course in Effective Teaching Practices. The partnership was announced shortly after the State of the University address in which university leaders shared the institution’s commitment to diversity and student achievement. (University Business)

With the midsemester mark nearing, Bonni Stachowiak outlines how she collects and uses feedback from students to improve their classroom experience. (Teaching In Higher Ed)

Hear from students about 20 actions that they—as well as professors—can take to help them learn. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

New research finds that students with certain characteristics—a sense of entitlement and an orientation to focus on grades—are more likely to perceive instructors as being politically biased. (Inside Higher Ed)

Robert Weisbuch argues in support of the importance of the academic department within the university and offers four suggestions for improvement when dysfunction exists. (Inside Higher Ed)

With the changing landscape of opportunities for students with performing arts degrees, universities are redesigning the curriculum to include a wider range of practical skills necessary for the new arts economy. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

Gary Olson, president of Daemen College, takes a page from athletic directors’ playbooks to outline how colleges and universities should be actively recruiting professors and administrators to build academic departments. (Huffington Post)

Ronald A. Johnson, president of Clark Atlanta University, outlines positive historical contributions to the nation made by historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), as well as the role they have to play in solving the problems of today. (The Washington Post)

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