News Roundup: Student Expectations and Intellectual Virtues

Student Expectations and Intellectual Virtues - acue.org

An instructor describes how she begins courses with discussions about students’ expectations for the course, and another suggests that teaching character is natural, and instructors should instill the intellectual virtues that are important to them in their students.

News and insights delivered to your inbox every week: The ‘Q’ Newsletter.

Syllabus Week
In her first semester as a teaching assistant, Ingrid Paredes’ pedagogy class began with the instructor asking students to share their objectives and expectations for the course. Now, Paredes begins her own courses with similar discussions, encouraging students to become active participants in the class. (GradHacker)


A High-Tech Learning Center Changed How These Professors Teach
In this video, see how redesigned classrooms, a Learning & Teaching Center initiative at the University of Maryland at College Park, have prompted instructors to rethink how they teach. Anya Galli Robertson, for example, factored the classroom space, where students sit in groups at round tables, into her teaching plan. (The Chronicle of Higher Education)


Yes, We Should Teach Character
“Academics can’t help but teach character,” David Gooblar posits. He suggests that educators consider the intellectual virtues they want to encourage in their students, pointing to Professor Jason Baehr’s nine core virtues, which include curiosity and intellectual courage. (Vitae)


Higher Ed Liberal Arts Degrees on the Upswing
With more students choosing to study liberal arts, David Hawkins advises that colleges demonstrate how these degrees have high ROI potential, are interdependent with technical-based education, and hone key skills, such as critical thinking, writing, and understanding other cultures, that are necessary for almost every profession. (University Business)


My First Experience Co-Writing an Open Textbook
Bonni Stachowiak collaborated with her class of 16 students to write an open textbook. Here, she describes the development of the project, process, and resources she and her students used to create the finished product. (Teaching in Higher Ed)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.