News Roundup: K-State Faculty on Tape and Bloodletting the Lecture

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The cameras were rolling in the classroom at Kansas State University this week. 

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Caught on tape. Top educators at Kansas State University were filmed in their classrooms for ACUE’s national faculty development program. (KMAN, The ‘Q’)

“Bloodletting” the lecture. A Nobel laureate from Stanford calls for higher education to revolutionize its approach to teaching. (NPR Ed)

Got teaching tips? An instructor adds to his already robust list of beliefs, advice, and other lessons learned during his time in academia. (Inside Higher Ed)

Chewing on “grit.” Researchers are at odds over the strategies needed to increase a student’s “grit” to persist academically. (Hechinger Report)

Going the distance. Students are more likely to use MOOCs for career advancement if they live in developing countries, according to a new study from the University of Washington. (Course Talk)

Students in charge. A professor reflects on what worked and what didn’t when she assigned her students to create their own taxonomies. (ProfHacker)

Culture is key. Creating a classroom environment in which students can learn is crucial to job satisfaction, argues a new book. (Inside Higher Ed)

Wrong is right. If you don’t understand the flaws in students’ reasoning, you’re not going to be able to dislodge their misconceptions and replace them with the correct concepts, a Nobel laureate says. (NPR Ed)

Space: A new frontier? Campus spaces can help universities foster and define their identity as places for discussion and collaboration. (Higher Ed Professor)

A value proposition. With college costs on the rise, some schools in Texas are opening food pantries to accommodate the needs of less affluent students. (Texas Tribune)

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